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President Clinton criticizes healthcare law

Updated: Wednesday, November 13, 2013 |
 President Clinton criticizes healthcare law story image
WASHINGTON, D.C. (NEWSCHANNEL 3) – Healthcare.gov officials will be back in the congressional hot seat Wednesday, answering questions about security and technical issues with the troubled website.

Up first is the White House Chief Technology Officer.

President Clinton, of all people, is criticizing the health care law and is saying President Obama failed to keep his promise that everyone will get to keep their health insurance under the new law.

This all comes at the same time as another round of questions on Capitol Hill.

Wednesday the House's chief investigator will look into the issues with the heath care website and question those responsible.

Meanwhile, the White House says President Obama has ordered his staff to find a solution for the nearly five-million Americans who will lose their insurance beginning January 1st.

The latest Quinnipiac poll shows just 44-percent of Americans view the president as honest and trustworthy.

This, as Bill Clinton says the president should keep his word and republicans are pressing ahead with a plan to allow people to keep their existing policies, which the White House opposes.

"I personally believe, even if it takes a change to the law, the president should honor the commitment the federal government made to those people and let them keep what they got," said President Clinton.

"That would cause more problems and create more problems, and do more harm than any good it would do," said Jay Carney, White House Press Secretary.

The House is expected to vote on that bill to allow people to keep their current policies this Friday.

The president isn't the only making some Americans unhappy. A new Gallup poll shows only nine-percent approve of the job Congress is doing.

That's the lowest approval rating in the 39-years Gallup has asked that question.

Several issues are dragging down the ratings for federal lawmakers. Americans blame incessant gridlock, partisan bickering and the fact that Congress is "not getting anything done."


    

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