WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY

TUESDAY 7AM - 8PM

WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY for Allegan, Barry, Calhoun, Eaton, Ionia, Kalamazoo, Kent, Mecosta, Montcalm, Newaygo, Oceana, Ottawa, Van Buren starting Tuesday at 7am and ending at 8pm.  

Snow will start to move into the area by daybreak Tuesday.  This will lead to a few slick spots during your morning commute.  Snow will start to mix with sleet by mid morning with accumulations totaling around 2-4 inches along and north of I-96 and 1-2" along and south of I-94.  Sleet will transitions into freezing rain by early to mid afternoon.  One to two tenths of an inch of ice accumulations are possible south of I-96.  Light rain showers are possible during the late afternoon/early evening and then will wind down quickly into the later evening hours.  Light freezing drizzle is possible after sunset. 

WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY for Berrien, Branch, Cass, Hillsdale, St. Joseph starting at 6am Tuesday and ending at 1pm. 

 

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Surgeon general urges new resolve to end smoking

Updated: Saturday, January 18, 2014 |
Surgeon general urges new resolve to end smoking story image
WASHINGTON (AP) - Unless there's more aggressive action against tobacco, the U.S. Surgeon General says, one in 13 children could see their lives shortened by smoking.

Acting Surgeon General Borish Lushniak spoke at a White House ceremony, marking the release of a 980-page report that calls for a new commitment to make the next generation a smoke-free generation.

It's been 50 years since the landmark 1964 surgeon general's report that launched the anti-smoking movement. Today, far fewer Americans are smoking -- about 18 percent of adults. That's down from more than 42 percent in 1964. But the report warns that the government may not meet its goal of lowering that rate to 12 percent by 2020.

The report says nearly a half million people will die from smoking-related diseases this year. It says if current trends continue, 5.6 million of today's children and teens will go on to die prematurely during adulthood because of smoking.
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