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Citizenship issue as Michigan prepares to vote

Updated: Monday, August 6, 2012 |
Citizenship issue as Michigan prepares to vote story image
(NEWSCHANNEL 3) - Tuesday, many will be heading to the polls to vote in Michigan's primary election.

There are several key races that Newschannel 3 will be watching.

West Michigan based Pete Hoekstra is trying to hold off two challengers to win the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate, and the right to challenge incumbent Senator Debbie Stabenow.

Meanwhile, two Democrats, Steve Pestka and Trevor Thomas are running to try to beat Republican Justin Amash in the 3rd Congressional District.

Current 6th District Representative Fred Upton is facing a primary challenge from Jack Hoogendyk.

As we prepare for election night, the I-Team is taking a critical look at how we vote.

When Michigan voters head to the poll Tuesday, they will be asked whether or not they are a U.S. citizen.

The question was vetoed by Governor Snyder recently, but he nixed it too late, because registrations were already printed in many places.

It's clear that even with the veto, the issue isn't dead.

Newschannel 3's Political Reporter David Bailey and the I-Team took a look at how the Governor, the Secretary of State and the Michigan State Legislature are trying to toe the difficult line of cleaning up an allegedly flawed voter system while not creating reforms that some say suppress turnout.
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Business News

Last Update on November 27, 2015 08:32 GMT


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