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Court documents reveal more details in teacher's pot bust

Updated: Wednesday, October 30, 2013 |
Court documents reveal more details in teacher
PAW PAW, Mich. (NEWSCHANNEL 3) - The I-Team is digging deeper into criminal charges filed against a teacher from West Michigan.

On Thursday, Newschannel 3 broke the news that Scot Granke was charged with multiple crimes related to an illegal marijuana grow operation found at his home on County Road 215 near Bangor.

Granke is now charged with two felonies for manufacturing marijuana, and four weapons charges.

The Paw Paw School District confirms that Granke, a middle school special education teacher, has been on leave since the beginning of the school year.

Court documents obtained by Newschannel 3 are spelling out how it all happened.

The teacher says the marijuana grow was all for medical patients, but we now know it wasn't legal.

It was Scot Granke's ex-wife Marlene that tipped off investigators to a marijuana grow in the pole barn outside the couple's Arlington Township home.

Dispatch confirmed she's contacted 9-1-1 several times in the last few months, with complaints linked to her ex-husband.

Court records confirm the Southwest Michigan Enforcement Team raided the home with her permission the third week of August, taking 4 unregistered handguns from the home, and later more than 30 pistols and long guns from the garage.

Newschannel 3 has learned that search also turned up a large number of marijuana plants.

Investigators called the grow "large" and "complex," and add that they later discovered a hash manufacturing operation and one pound of processed marijuana.

Police interviews reveal Granke told them two days later the drugs were for his patients, and he was licensed to grow marijuana medically.

He claimed the hash—which is illegal under the medical marijuana act—was “easier for patients to take.”

“A caregiver can grow up to 12 plants, plants defined as anything with a root,” explained Annette Crocker, a Registered Nurse with Michigan Holistic Health. “So cloves, seedlings, flowers, anything with the root counts as a plant. And they can have up to 2.5 ounces to any patient they care for, and they can have up to 5 patients.”

Court records reveal Granke was licensed for three patients, allowing him to grow up to 36 plants, and that he is an expired patient.

SWET recovered nearly double that—66 plants.

We reached out to Granke on Tuesday, who told Newschannel 3 he needed to speak to his lawyer before speaking on camera.

He's due back in court for a preliminary hearing in November.

The school district says Granke will remain on leave until a judge has made a decision on the case.
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