[an error occurred while processing this directive]

I-Team: Corruption allegations lingering for months prove unfounded

Updated: Saturday, August 3, 2013 |
I-Team: Corruption allegations lingering for months prove unfounded story image
BATTLE CREEK, Mich. (NEWSCHANNEL 3) - The Newschannel 3 I-Team is digging deeper into corruption allegations within the Battle Creek Police Department, that all started with a letter written by two city commissioners on behalf of a Battle Creek Police officer.

The Newschannel 3 I-Team was given dozens of emails that were written by a whistle-blower, who is an active officer.

He sent concerns to police brass and city leaders, and the allegations in it have a city commissioner wondering why no one paid any attention to it.

But the catch is, Newshcannel 3 was told that attention was paid, and now the police chief may take that commissioner to court.

The emails lay out more than three years of allegations, made by a Battle Creek Police Officer that we have been asked not to name.

The officer claims he has received threats and retaliation after he says he reported an act of misconduct by a fellow officer.

He wrote to Police Chief Jackie Hampton in 2010:

"Sir, as you may not be aware of, I have had threats made on my safety in the forms of physical violence."

He goes on to detail the discovery of "a large knife" in his department mailbox, and that he was "told by my supervisors to move on and disregard them."

Chief Hampton responded, saying that he was "very disturbed by the behavior and actions you're being subjected to," and that they "will not be tolerated or allowed."

The chain of emails show that it went to the Department of Internal Affairs Inspector, and the City Manager, where the officer writes "I have had officers completely fail to back me up on two man calls, and yet I still continue to be the 'bad guy' within the administration."

The Police Chief and City Manager tell Newschannel 3 that the allegations have been investigated twice.

The Chief says a Lieutenant and Department of Internal Affairs Inspector both came up with "unfounded" results, because they couldn't determine who put it there.

The Chief added that on November 1st, 2010, three members of the department sat down with the officer and told him those results.

Meanwhile, City Commissioner Jeff Domenico stands by the allegations.

"What people need to understand is that this is only one slice of the pie; there's documentation of nepotism, discrimination, hostile work environment, falsification of legal documentations."

Chief Hampton sent Newschannel 3 a statement that stated he will be "looking at legal options to pursue against Commissioner Domenico for alleging we're corrupt."

He also says, "I deserve an apology from Commissioner Domenico, and he also needs to apologize to the entire department and city."

County Prosecutor David Gilbert told Newschannel 3 he also sat down with Commissioner Domenico and the officer about the allegations just last week.

"One person talks about corruption, but corruption involves breaking the law; in this case, I haven't seen anything with corruption," said Gilbert.

He also looked through those aforementioned emails, and he says to date, nothing he has seen is criminal.

Prosecutor Gilbert did add, however, that if there are criminal allegations, he wants to hear about it, but again, there is no corruption here.

There have been two investigations into the allegations of the officer.

Newschannel 3 has sent a Freedom of Information Act request to get the full report.
comments powered by Disqus
advertisement

What do you want to see?

If you have a story idea for the I-Team, you can contact us using the form below or by calling 269-388-4612.
Please re-enter the code shown in the image below.

Business News

Last Update on March 27, 2015 07:26 GMT

ECONOMY-THE DAY AHEAD

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The government will issue its third and final estimate of how fast the U.S. economy grew in the October-December period today when the Commerce Department releases the fourth-quarter U.S. gross domestic product.

Also today, the University of Michigan will release its monthly index of consumer sentiment for March.

JAPAN-ECONOMY

TOKYO (AP) -- Japan has reported lackluster inflation and wages data for February that suggest its economic recovery remains in the doldrums.

The government said Friday that core inflation was 2.0 percent in February, down from 2.2 percent in January. Excluding the impact of an April 2014 sales tax hike, inflation was flat.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has sought to spur growth through extreme monetary easing by the central bank that is meant to drive prices higher, prompting consumers and businesses to accelerate their spending.

But household spending fell 2.9 percent from a year earlier in February, while base wages slipped 1.9 percent, the 13th straight monthly decline. Sluggish wage growth has hurt consumers' purchasing power.

In a positive sign, unemployment fell to 3.5 percent in February from 3.6 percent the month before.

YAHOO-STOCK BUYBACK

NEW YORK (AP) -- Yahoo says it will buy back $2 billion in company stock as it prepares to spin off its stake in Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba.

Investors were pushing Yahoo to use some of the proceeds from the Alibaba spinoff to buy back stock, and the company had said it would keep buying back stock to return cash to shareholders.

The stock repurchase program will expire March 31, 2018. Yahoo has $726 million remaining on previous stock buyback plan, which was approved in 2013 and expires at the end of 2016.

In January, Yahoo Inc. said it will spin off its stake in Alibaba into a separate company later this year. The move will allow the new entity to pay lower taxes on Alibaba stock sales than Yahoo would have.

RADIOSHACK BANKRUPTCY

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) -- A hearing on whether to approve the bankruptcy sale of assets of electronics retailer RadioShack is under way. It opened Thursday with the company seeking court approval of the purported winning bid, and an attorney for a losing bidder, Salus Capital Partners, describing the auction as a sham and asking a Delaware judge to reopen the sale process.

RadioShack, based in Fort Worth, Texas, says an offer valued at about $160 million from hedge fund Standard General LP was the best bid submitted in an auction that began Monday in New York and was suddenly reconvened in Wilmington, Delaware, after midnight Thursday, just hours before the court hearing.

Standard General's bid, which would keep 1,743 stores open and preserve about 7,500 jobs, consists mostly of credit on debt it is owed.

ARCTIC OIL DRILLING

WASHINGTON (AP) -- An Energy Department advisory council study says the U.S. should immediately begin a push to exploit its enormous trove of oil in the Arctic waters off of Alaska, or risk a renewed reliance on imported oil in the future.

The U.S. has drastically cut imports and transformed itself into the world's biggest producer of oil and natural gas by tapping huge reserves in shale rock formations. But the government predicts that the shale boom won't last much beyond the next decade.

In order for the U.S. to keep domestic production high and imports low, oil companies should start probing the Artic now because it takes 10 to 30 years of preparation and drilling to bring oil to market. The study's draft executive summary was obtained by the Associated Press.

The study, produced by the National Petroleum Council at the request of Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, comes at a time when many argue the world needs less oil, not more. U.S. oil storage facilities are filling up, the price of oil has collapsed from over $100 a barrel to around $50, and prices are expected to stay relatively low for years to come.

NUKE REPOSITORY-REPORT

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) -- Experts from national laboratories around the country have determined that an incompatible cocktail of nitrate salts and organic cat litter is to blame for a mishap that forced the closure of the nation's only underground nuclear waste repository.

The independent technical team released its report Thursday.

The team was charged by the U.S. Energy Department to investigate the chemical reactions that may have led to the release of radioactive material at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in February 2014.

The report comes more than a year after a single container of waste stored at the repository breached and contaminated 21 workers with low-level radioactivity.

The container came from Los Alamos National Laboratory.

While it couldn't determine the cause of the breach with absolute certainty, the team says it's clear a thermal reaction inside the container forced the lid to pop.

MONSANTO-CHEMICAL RELEASES

BOISE, Idaho (AP) -- Monsanto Co. has agreed to pay $600,000 in fines for not reporting hundreds of uncontrolled releases of dangerous chemicals at its eastern Idaho phosphate plant.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Justice on Thursday announced the agreement involving the biotechnology company's Soda Springs facilities.

Federal officials say the chemicals released are hazardous and can pose serious health risks.

Federal officials say the releases occurred between 2006 and 2009, with the plant emitting hydrogen cyanide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and mercury. Companies are required to report such releases immediately.

The Soda Springs facilities are operated by P4 Production LLC, a wholly owned Monsanto subsidiary.

The company says in a statement that it cares deeply about public health and is committed to complying with applicable laws.

advertisement