I-Team: Left Alone

Updated: Saturday, August 3 2013, 12:09 AM EDT
I-Team: Left Alone story image
(NEWSCHANNEL 3) - Later this month, the woman whose three young children died in the Interfaith Apartment fire in Kalamazoo in February will be in civil court.

She'll be asking to regain custody of her surviving 4-year-old, who managed to escape the flames when those four kids were left home alone.

In the meantime, the Kalamazoo County Prosecutor's Office is reviewing the fire to see if criminal charges will be filed.

Now, one state lawmaker is launching a new campaign to make sure this kind of unbearable tragedy doesn't happen here again.

Sally Reames is the executive director of the Community Healing Centers, where they work with abused and neglected children and their families.

She says that kids under the age of 10 should never be left home alone, but too often, they are.

"Children younger than that don't necessarily have the resources to get help or ask for help when they need it," she explained. "So at Community Healing Centers, we would say, it's not a good choice to leave kids home alone."

Because, Of course, there are so many dangers lurking.

In mid-February, a Kalamazoo apartment caught on fire at Interfaith Homes, with four young kids inside.

An infant, twin 3-year-olds, and a 4-year old. Only the 4-year-old survived.

Their mother, who was not home at the time--and a friend with whom she claims she left the children--are both under investigation.

One thing is for sure though. No one involved in the Interfaith fire will be specifically charged with leaving the kids home alone and unattended.

That's because leaving kids home alone and unattended is not a crime in Michigan, no matter how young they are.

"There isn't a specific law that says if you leave your child unattended it is a crime punishable by a certain period of time," explained Kalamazoo County Prosecutor Jeff Getting. "The child's age isn't a factor. It could be a baby."

Getting says that every child left home alone case is different, and the totality of the circumstances must be carefully analyzed.

Neglect--or more serious abuse charges--could be filed, but only when police come armed with a lot of evidence.

For it to be a crime, there would have to be a clear and present danger--or proof the parent intended to abandon or harm the child.

As of now, simply leaving them at home doesn't qualify.

Enter State Representative Sean McCann, a Kalamazoo Democrat, who says he is working on a plan that could change that.

"I'm drafting legislation that would create penalties when children are left unattended for an unreasonable amount of time," Rep. McCann said.

Inspired by a 2009 law making it illegal to leave kids younger than 6 alone in cars, Rep. McCann is sponsoring new legislation to make it illegal to leave young children home as well.

"Often times the legislature is prone to closing the barn doors after the horses get out," Rep. McCann said. "So something bad happens and we realize there's not legislation on the books."

Until such a law can be passed, though, the Community Healing Centers is reaching out to parents, making cold calls and house calls.

They bring gift bags and diapers and offer moms and dads free parenting support in their own homes. For now, that's all we can do.

"We believe it's important that we go to where they are and teach parent and to the child in their setting," Reames said.

Newschannel 3 has been told that the bill in question is currently being fast tracked. We'll keep an eye on things and let you know how it turns out.
I-Team: Left Alone
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Business News

Last Update on April 21, 2014 07:28 GMT

WORLD MARKETS

BEIJING (AP) -- Asian stocks were mixed today in light trading after Japan reported a jump in its trade deficit and investors looked ahead to economic data this week from China and Korea.

Investors are waiting for the preliminary version of HSBC Corp.'s survey of Chinese manufacturing due out Wednesday for signs of whether an economic slowdown has bottomed out.

Benchmark crude oil fell but remained above $104 a barrel. The dollar gained against the yen and was flat against the euro.

ECONOMY-THE DAY AHEAD

Business events and economic reports scheduled for the coming week

WASHINGTON -- There's only one major economic report due out today. It's the leading indicators for March from the Conference Board.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, housing will be the focus of two reports. The National Association of Realtors will release existing home sales for March tomorrow. And on Wednesday, the Commerce Department will release new home sales for March.

The government will report the weekly jobless claims on Thursday. Also, the Commerce Department will release the durable goods numbers for March. And Freddie Mac will report weekly mortgage rates.

NABE-ECONOMY SURVEY

NEW YORK (AP) -- A quarterly survey from the National Association of Business Economics finds that rising costs for materials and labor appear to be pressuring businesses.

During the first quarter of the year, 31 percent of businesses surveyed reported higher material costs. That's more than double the 15 percent that saw costs rise in the previous survey. Thirty-five percent of respondents reported rising wages and salaries at their businesses in the past three months, up from 23 percent in January.

Yet those who said they raised the prices they charge in the past three months remained unchanged at 20 percent.

The survey of 72 members was conducted between March 18 and April 1.

The survey findings say it appears businesses weren't able to "pass on costs increases, resulting in increased pressure on margins."

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UNDATED (AP) -- Providence, R.I. is suing dozens of Wall Street banks and other financial companies over high-frequency trading.

The suit says stock exchanges, investment banks and others defrauded investors by manipulating market data in favor of split-second stock-trading firms.

The suit's defendants include the Nasdaq Stock Market and the New York Stock Exchange; major banks such as JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs and Citigroup; and trading firms including Chopper Trading and Jump Trading.

The lawsuit comes amid heightened government scrutiny into whether advantages in computer hardware and placement enable some to get millisecond timing advances on trades.

The federal complaint was filed Friday in New York on behalf of investors who traded stocks in the U.S. since April 18, 2009.

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NEW YORK (AP) -- General Mills is scrapping a controversial plan to strip consumers of their right to sue the food company.

The company, which owns Cheerios, Progresso and Yoplait, had posted a notice on its website notifying visitors that using the company's websites or engaging with it online in a variety of other ways meant they would have to give up their right to sue.

The Minnesota-based company said that people instead would have to resolve disputes through informal negotiation or arbitration.

The change was widely denounced on social media after The New York Times first reported it Wednesday. General Mills said in a statement emailed to media outlets late Saturday that it would revert back to its previous legal terms.

JAPAN-ECONOMY

TOKYO (AP) -- Japan's trade deficit surged nearly 70 percent to a record 13.75 trillion yen ($134 billion) in the last fiscal year as exports failed to keep pace with surging costs for imported oil and gas.

The Finance Ministry reported Monday that exports in the year that ended March 31 rose 10.8 percent over the year before to 70.8 trillion yen ($690.5 billion) while imports climbed 17.3 percent to 84.6 trillion yen ($825 billion).

Resource-scarce Japan's costs for imports of energy have soared since the March 2011 disaster at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Plant led to the closures of all of its nuclear reactors for safety checks.

Meanwhile, a weakening of the Japanese yen last year further pushed costs for all imports higher, while exports have risen only modestly.

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BEIJING (AP) -- Global and Chinese automakers are looking to the Beijing auto show to help boost sales in a slowing, intensely competitive market.

Brands from General Motors Co. to Chinese SUV maker Great Wall Motors are unveiling new and restyled sedans, sport utility vehicles and other models at Auto China 2014 this week.

China is the world's biggest auto market, with 17.9 million vehicles sold last year. But sales growth is forecast to slow from last year's 15.7 percent to 8 to 10 percent this year. And competition is intense, with global automakers jostling with 25 local brands for sales.

Ambitious domestic brands such as Chery Ltd. are losing ground to foreign rivals. Sales by Chinese independent brands shrank 2.6 percent from a year earlier in the first quarter.

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That could push a decision about the controversial oil pipeline until after the midterm elections in November.

The State Department is citing a recent decision by a Nebraska judge that overturned a state law that allowed the pipeline's path through the state. The State Department says that created uncertainty and ongoing litigation.

The government is not saying how much longer the review will take. But it says the process isn't starting over.

The pipeline has become a politically fraught issue. Republicans criticize President Barack Obama for taking too long to decide. The State Department has jurisdiction because the pipeline would cross the border between the U.S. and Canada.

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WASHINGTON (AP) -- A study paid for by the federal government says biofuels made from the leftovers of harvested corn plants are worse than gasoline for global warming in the short term.

The research published in the journal Nature Climate Change challenges the Obama administration's conclusions that biofuels are a much cleaner oil alternative and will help fight climate change.

The study is being criticized by the biofuels industry and Obama administration as flawed.

Corn residue is one of the most promising ways to make cellulosic biofuels. Biofuels have struggled to reach the volumes required by law.

The administration and biofuel supporters claim biofuels are better for the environment than are gasoline and corn ethanol.

A 2007 law requires that they release 60 percent less carbon than gas to qualify as renewable fuel.

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DETROIT (AP) -- Government documents show that General Motors waited years to recall nearly 335,000 Saturn Ions for power steering failures despite getting thousands of consumer complaints and warranty repair claims.

Additionally, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration didn't seek a recall of the 2004-2007 compact cars even though it opened an investigation more than two years ago. The government's auto safety watchdog found the problem caused 12 crashes and two injuries.

The documents, posted on the NHTSA's website Saturday, show yet another delay by GM in recalling unsafe vehicles. It's also another example of government regulators reacting slowly to a safety problem despite being alerted by consumers and the company's warranty data.

GM and NHTSA were criticized for their response to a deadly ignition-switch problem in more than 2.6 million small cars.

OSCAR MAYER-RECALL

NEW YORK (AP) -- Kraft Foods is recalling 96,000 pounds of its Oscar Mayer wieners because they may mistakenly contain cheese.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service said Sunday that packages of Kraft's "Oscar Mayer Classic Wieners" may instead contain the company's "Classic Cheese Dogs."

The agency says the product labels are incorrect and do not reflect the ingredients associated with the pasteurized cheese in the cheese dogs. Those products were made with milk and the known allergen is not declared on the label.

It said the problem was discovered by a consumer who notified Kraft on Friday. The company alerted the USDA the following day, according to the statement.

IRS-AUDITS

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A new government report says the Internal Revenue Service audits less than 1 percent of large partnerships, and that's drawing criticism from Congress.

The Government Accountability Office says the number of large businesses organized as partnerships has more than tripled since 2002, yet hardly any get close scrutiny by the IRS. In 2012, only 0.8 percent were subjected to field exams in which agents do a thorough review of books and records.

The GAO defines large partnerships as those with more than 100 partners and more than $100 million in assets.

Democratic Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan says many of the largest hedge funds and private equity firms are escaping IRS scrutiny.

The report says the audit rate has been persistently low since at least 2007.

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