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I-Team: School Security - Part 1

Updated: Saturday, August 3, 2013 |
I-Team: School Security - Part 1 story image
KALAMAZOO, Mich. (NEWSCHANNEL 3) - There's been so much talk about guns and what to do to prevent mass tragedies.

But, numbers show your child is much more likely to become a victim of theft, assault, or bullying, than of murder.

Video of a fight appeared on YouTube, and according to the posting, it happened at Loy Norrix High School--where KPS has a police officer in the building.

Documents we obtained through the Freedom of Information Act show that school resource officer is a very busy person.

At Norrix alone, we surveyed 240 school days, wherein documents show there were 308 total calls for police service.

Of those calls, 41 were for simple things--rescues or welfare checks. However, 14 were for some kind of sexual assault, 56 for assault and battery cases or fights, 66 for larceny or theft.

That's in one high school in just more than one school year.

Loy Norrix was only a small part of the investigation, however.

We obtained police dispatch logs for most of the other schools in Kalamazoo Public Schools, along with some schools in Battle Creek, Grand Rapids, and Allegan.

Districts have an obligation to report, by law, just about every incident that would involve law enforcement on their campus to the state's Center for Educational Performance and Information.

As a result, we assumed the I-Team's data would match up with the state's.

After pouring through all the data though, there were some extreme anomalies that we couldn't understand.

For example, in Kalamazoo Public Schools we found 104 reports of assault and battery or fights; 17 criminal sexual conduct complaints; 2 robberies; and 63 larceny cases.

What was reported by the district to the state? Zero assault and battery or fights; zero criminal sexual conduct cases; zero robberies; and 23 larceny cases.

Even more odd, it seems the district hasn't reported an assault and battery to the state for the last four years, and there are no reports of sex assaults dating back five years.

Kalamazoo Superintendent Dr. Michael Rice issued a statement to Newschannel 3, saying that "WWMT's request is the first a parent, students, or community member has ever brought the CEPI report to our attention."

Our audit of Grand Rapids Public Schools, on the other hand, shows that the school is largely reporting to CEPI correctly.

"I believe in CEPI, but CEPI, like every other system, is only as good as the information put into it," said GRPS Security Director Larry Johnson.

Battle Creek and Allegan also passed the I-Team's truth test, so we wanted to know whether Kalamazoo's school leaders are going to get it right this year.

We didn't get an answer.

To find out the crime statistics reported by every school in the state, click here.
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Business News

Last Update on September 23, 2014 08:16 GMT

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HONG KONG (AP) -- Growth in China's sprawling manufacturing industry unexpectedly ticked higher in September, easing concerns about the No. 2 economy's recovery.

HSBC's purchasing manager index edged up to 50.5 this month from 50.2 in August, based on a 100-point scale. Numbers below 50 indicate contraction.

Analysts had expected the reading to fall for a second month, dragged down by the slumping property market.

The modestly upbeat number comes after an official report earlier this month showed China's factory output slowed sharply in August, which sparked fears momentum was fading and prompted some analysts to lower their full-year economic growth forecasts.

China's economic growth edged up in the April-June quarter to 7.5 percent after policymakers rolled out a batch of relief measures aimed at areas including railways and public housing. But analysts say further increments in growth will be hard to achieve without more government spending.

CALIFORNIA DROUGHT

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Officials say the giant wholesaler that provides drinking water for half the California population has drained two-thirds of its stored supplies as the state contends with a punishing drought.

Without plentiful rain and snow in coming months, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California could consider cutbacks to its regional distributors next year. If such limits are approved, that could lead to rationing or cuts for households in portions of Southern California.

At the current rate, billions of gallons in remaining agency reserves could be exhausted in about 18 months. The agency built up those reserves over time as a hedge against the state's periodic droughts.

But those supplies have tightened as the state has experienced a combination of sparse rainfall and unusually warm temperatures -- 2014 is on track to be the hottest year in California since record-keeping began over a century ago.

Gov. Jerry Brown, who declared a drought emergency earlier this year, is urging residents to voluntarily reduce water use.

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AMSTERDAM (AP) -- Royal Philips NV says it will spin off its lighting division and the rest of its operations into two separate companies, continuing a radical reshaping of one of Europe's best-known corporations.

Tuesday's announcement follows the decision in June to spin off its lighting components arm, and it is no longer clear whether Philips is the world's largest lighting manufacturer, though it is a leader in cutting edge LED lighting technology

Chief Executive Frans van Houten said the company's consumer division -- which makes a range of household products such as coffee makers and shavers -- and its health care division will operate as a single "HealthTech" company. Both the lighting and HealthTech company will continue to use the Philips brand.WALL STREET-PROTEST

NEW YORK (AP) -- More than 100 people have been arrested in a sit-in protest in Manhattan's financial district in New York.

More than 1,000 activists blocked parts of Broadway Monday to protest what they see as the roles of corporate and economic institutions in the climate crisis.

The sit-in followed Sunday's march in which more than 100,000 people warned that climate change is destroying the Earth.

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WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Obama administration is cracking down on American companies that are trying to reincorporate overseas to avoid paying U.S. taxes.

In a so-called "tax inversion," a U.S. business merges with or is acquired by a foreign company in a country with a lower tax rate.

The Treasury Department says it's putting forward regulations that will make inversions less lucrative by barring some of the techniques companies use to defer their taxes. It's also making it harder for companies to pursue an inversion by tightening the requirement that the company's former owners own less than 80 percent of the new company.

Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew says the steps will ensure that it's no longer financially beneficial for companies to use that tactic.

The new measures will take effect immediately.

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DETROIT (AP) -- Detroit's water department is defending its policy of cutting off service to people with unpaid bills. It says continuing to provide free service to those households could be "very devastating" to the department's budget.

An attorney for the water department told a judge Monday that "humanitarian concerns are very compelling," but that so is fairness.

After thousands of shutoffs earlier this year, there were protests and appeals -- including one to the United Nations.

The judge hearing the city's bankruptcy trial set aside that case Monday to hear evidence in the water controversy. A coalition representing low-income residents is asking the judge to suspend water shutoffs, and to restore service to people who have lost it.

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Under the program, tipsters who report corporate fraud or other misconduct are eligible if they give the SEC information that leads to an enforcement action resulting in more than $1 million in penalties. They can receive from 10 to 30 percent of the money the SEC recovers from a company or person.

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