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I-Team: School Security - Part 2

Updated: Saturday, August 3, 2013 |
I-Team: School Security - Part 2 story image
LANSING, Mich. (NEWSCHANNEL 3) - Reaction is flooding in from all sides following Monday night's I-Team investigation.

We found one of the simplest things we can do to protect our kids at school is collecting crime data properly, and evidence shows that isn't being done the right way.

Lawmakers weren't exactly happy to hear that we found apparent mistakes in the state's crime statistics, but despite all the talk about doing things to create safe schools, it doesn't appear that lawmakers have a legislative solution to the problem.

They told Newschannel 3 that a new law might not be needed to do what should be done on the local level.

"This is a key example where parents need to get involved and they need to react," said Rep. Lisa Lyons (R-Alto). "They need to say to their school board members, this is simply unacceptable. This is our kids safety on the line."

The I-Team found in documents we obtained that leaders at the Kalamazoo Public School district call the public safety department at the rate of once a day at some schools in the district, but the district reported very few of those cases to the state as required by law.

Kalamazoo Superintendent Dr. Michael Rice issued a statement Monday, saying that Kalamazoo's internal accounting systems don't match up with the state's accounting system, creating what appear to be errors.

We were confused when we found that KPS had not reported an assault and battery to the state for the last four years, or a sexual assault in five years.

The I-Team also received emails from educators telling us to look at another viewpoint--that they believe the state is piling on too many mandates and not providing enough funding to get all the work done.

Democratic Representative Brandon Dillon echoed sentiments from both parties when he told us that "it certainly doesn't excuse anybody from not complying with the law."

It appears that in the wake of the I-Team's research, lawmakers will take the information and test the system further to see if there are any other leaks.

In our in-depth look at the numbers, kids in schools are far more likely to be victims of theft or bullying than violent crimes.

Wednesday night on Newschannel 3, Live at 11, we'll tell you why the state is no longer collecting data on bullying.
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