I-Team: School Security - Part 2

Updated: Saturday, August 3 2013, 12:09 AM EDT
I-Team: School Security - Part 2 story image
LANSING, Mich. (NEWSCHANNEL 3) - Reaction is flooding in from all sides following Monday night's I-Team investigation.

We found one of the simplest things we can do to protect our kids at school is collecting crime data properly, and evidence shows that isn't being done the right way.

Lawmakers weren't exactly happy to hear that we found apparent mistakes in the state's crime statistics, but despite all the talk about doing things to create safe schools, it doesn't appear that lawmakers have a legislative solution to the problem.

They told Newschannel 3 that a new law might not be needed to do what should be done on the local level.

"This is a key example where parents need to get involved and they need to react," said Rep. Lisa Lyons (R-Alto). "They need to say to their school board members, this is simply unacceptable. This is our kids safety on the line."

The I-Team found in documents we obtained that leaders at the Kalamazoo Public School district call the public safety department at the rate of once a day at some schools in the district, but the district reported very few of those cases to the state as required by law.

Kalamazoo Superintendent Dr. Michael Rice issued a statement Monday, saying that Kalamazoo's internal accounting systems don't match up with the state's accounting system, creating what appear to be errors.

We were confused when we found that KPS had not reported an assault and battery to the state for the last four years, or a sexual assault in five years.

The I-Team also received emails from educators telling us to look at another viewpoint--that they believe the state is piling on too many mandates and not providing enough funding to get all the work done.

Democratic Representative Brandon Dillon echoed sentiments from both parties when he told us that "it certainly doesn't excuse anybody from not complying with the law."

It appears that in the wake of the I-Team's research, lawmakers will take the information and test the system further to see if there are any other leaks.

In our in-depth look at the numbers, kids in schools are far more likely to be victims of theft or bullying than violent crimes.

Wednesday night on Newschannel 3, Live at 11, we'll tell you why the state is no longer collecting data on bullying.
I-Team: School Security - Part 2
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Business News

Last Update on April 17, 2014 17:08 GMT

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WASHINGTON (AP) -- The number of people applying for U.S. unemployment benefits last week rose 2,000 to a seasonally adjusted 304,000. Jobless claims continue to be near pre-recession levels despite the slight increase.

The Labor Department says that the four-week average of applications, a less volatile measure, fell 4,750 to 312,000. That is the lowest four-week average since October 2007, just two months before the Great Recession started. The average has fallen by 53,500 applications over the past 12 months.

Applications are a proxy for layoffs. The current level of claims suggests that employers are holding on their workers with the expectation of stronger economic growth ahead.

Employers added 192,000 jobs in March and 197,000 in February, the Labor Department reported. Hiring has picked up after a slowdown caused by severe winter weather.

MORTGAGE RATES

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Average U.S. rates on fixed mortgages fell this week for the second straight week as the spring home-buying season begins.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac says the average rate for the 30-year loan fell to 4.27 percent from 4.34 percent last week. The average for the 15-year mortgage eased to 3.33 percent from 3.38 percent.

Mortgage rates have risen about a full percentage point since hitting record lows about a year ago.

Many analysts have been expecting an improving economy to lift the housing market, which has been recovering over the past two years. But housing has struggled to maintain momentum. Rising home prices and higher mortgage rates have held back some potential home buyers. Others have had trouble qualifying for mortgages.

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NEW YORK (AP) -- Investment bank Goldman Sachs says its first-quarter earnings fell as fixed income trading slumped.

The bank earned $1.9 billion in the quarter, down 11 percent from the same period a year earlier when it made $2.2 billion.

The earnings were equivalent to $4.02 a share. Analysts polled by FactSet had predicted earnings of $3.49 a share.

Revenue totaled $9.3 billion, down 8 percent from a year earlier, when the bank generated revenue of $10.1 billion. The latest quarterly revenue beat analysts' expectations of $8.7 billion.

Goldman's stock rose $2.78, or 1.8 percent, to $160 in pre-market trading.

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NEW YORK (AP) -- PepsiCo reports a stronger-than-expected first-quarter profit as the company slashed costs and sold more snacks around the world.

The company, which makes Frito-Lay, Gatorade, Mountain Dew and Tropicana, says global snack volume rose 2 percent while beverages were even from a year ago.

In its closely watched North American beverage unit, PepsiCo Inc. says volume was even. Growth in other drinks offset a 1 percent decline in sodas.

For the quarter, the company earned $1.22 billion, or 79 cents per share. Not including one-time items, it earned 83 cents per share, above the 75 cents per share Wall Street expected.

A year ago, it earned $1.08 billion, or 69 cents per share.

Revenue edged up to $12.62 billion, higher than the $12.39 billion analysts expected.

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EL SEGUNDO, Calif. (AP) -- Toy maker Mattel says weak sales of Barbie and markdowns to clear out excess inventory left over from a sluggish holiday season led to an unexpected first-quarter loss.

Toy makers are facing a weak environment globally due to the uncertain economy and popularity of electronic gadgets.

The largest U.S. toy maker says its net loss for the three months ended March 31 totaled $11.2 million, or 3 cents per share. That compares with net income of $38.5 million, or 11 cents per share last year. Analysts expected earnings of 7 cents per share.

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The nation's second-largest discounter first dabbled with subscriptions last September, trying to win over haggard parents with 150 baby care products.

That program has been expanded more than tenfold this week to nearly 1,600 items across a much wider array of consumer goods. Everything from beauty products and pet supplies, to home office supplies like printer ink, are now available through subscription.

Target, based in Minneapolis, is playing catch up in the subscription arena, which has exploded as companies test consumer appetites for almost every niche, from socks to razors, to clothing and entertainment.

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