WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY & WINTER STORM WARNING

SATURDAY EVENING THROUGH EARLY MONDAY

The National Weather Service has issued a WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY for all of West Michigan except counties along the Michigan-Indiana border, effective from 7 pm Saturday until 6 am Monday. A strong storm will be crossing the Ohio Valley Sunday, bringing snow to West Michigan, with some areas perhaps seeing as much as 10-12" of accumulation. Snowfall will be heaviest south as opposed to north, so along/south of I-94 is where the highest accumulations are expected... 6-10" possible. However, Allegan, Barry, Eaton, Ottawa, and Kent could see anywhere from 4-6". Additionally, gusty winds will be blowing the snow quite a bit, causing drifting on roads along with poor visibility. Travel is discouraged from late Saturday night through Sunday night.

The National Weather Service has issued a WINTER STORM WARNING for the following counties in West Michigan, effective from 7 pm Saturday until 4 am Monday: Berrien, Cass, St.Joseph, Branch, and Hillsdale. A strong winter storm moving into/across the Ohio Valley will bring periods of heavy snow to the Warning area, beginning late tonight and extending through at least Sunday evening. Forecast models indicate between 8 and 12" of accumulation are possible. Additionally, strong winds will cause blowing and drifting snow. Driving conditions will be hazardous Sunday. Travel is not encouraged.

Stay with Newschannel 3 and wwmt.com for the latest updates.

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I-Team Special Report: Detox Dilemma

Updated: Wednesday, February 26, 2014 |
I-Team Special Report: Detox Dilemma story image
KALAMAZOO, Mich. (NEWSCHANNEL 3) - It's a decades old method for treating drug addiction, but now more people than ever before in Michigan are using methadone therapy.

The drug is an addictive painkiller, and the Newschannel 3 I-Team found the government is paying millions to give it out, with some people taking it for free for years.

There are six methadone treatment facilities across Michigan, with one in Kalamazoo.

They are for-profit businesses, and making money because while other things are being cut in Michigan, money for methadone therapy for drug addiction keeps increasing.

Every morning before dawn, they pull into the parking lot and line up outside the clinic.

For thousands of people across Michigan, the day starts with methadone treatments. A small dose of liquid methadone before heading off to work or school.

And there are usually big crowds outside the clinic.

"Like I said, it was like five years ago when I came, and they were in the building over there," one man said. "There were nowhere near this many people."

The man is just beginning a new treatment schedule at Victory Clinical Services, in Kalamazoo.

It's all paid for by Medicaid, and he says he can continue in the program as long as it takes to overcome his heroin addiction. Some of his friends have been coming for years.

"Some people just do it, and they just stay here and they never, I don't think it should be done like that," he said.

"There's some people that have been going ten, 15 years," he added.

Methadone is usually used to treat heroin addiction, and is itself an addictive drug, but it is slow-release.

The strategy of the government and providers is that at least on methadone instead of heroin, people can still function and have jobs.

But with the government paying for it, there's no incentive to stop taking it.

"Fortunately or unfortunately, substance abuse treatment is now a business," said Dennis Simpson, with the WMU Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program.

Simpson points out that companies that distribute the treatments are for-profit businesses, and need customers.

"If you see people that are heads of agencies they are less therapists many times and more business administrators, so they look at the bottom line," he said. "When you get into for-profit entities, you have an obligation and responsibility to your stock holders to produce a profit, which means you have to have a number of people in there."

The Michigan Department of Community Health tells us people can receive the treatments for two years for free. After that, they can continue indefinitely if they prove a medical need.

The I-Team dug into the numbers and found in the last three years, the number of people getting methadone has increased, as has the amount of money the state spends on treatments.

$6.5 million in 2010, $6.8 million in 2011, and $8.3 million in 2012.

This has been happening at a time when other programs in Michigan were being cut.

For example, unemployment benefits were reduced from 26 to 20 weeks in 2012.

Higher education funding was reduced by $225 million. But methadone spending went up $1.5 million.

But the state feels the treatments are effective for some people. A Department of Community Health spokesperson told us:

"The Michigan Department of Community Health certainly sees value in supporting the substance use programs across the state, especially given the increase we're seeing in the abuse of different drugs. MDCH is continually working with our partners to find new ways to address substance use issues as they arise as well as continuing the funding of effective programs."

But people like Dr. Simpson who study rehabilitation say not everyone getting methadone truly needs to have it--or to get it for free.

Victory Clinical Services referred our questions to a spokesperson for the National Association of Opioid Dependence, who issued the following statement:

"The bottom line is that providing access to such treatment saves society an enormous amount of money. Important factors to take into account include emergency room admissions, criminal justice related issues including costs of police and courts.

"Some may need to use this medication for their natural lifetime, just as hypertensives and diabetics would remain on their medications."

=====================

The entire statement can be found below:

With regard to the effectiveness of methadone maintenance treatment, it is one of the most researched medications for the treatment of any chronic disease in the world. Most of the methadone related research has been funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, which is part of the National Institutes of Health. The efficacy of treatment is certainly referenced in the NIDA publication “Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment”, which was published in a Second Edition in 2009. It provides an important point about the use of Medication Assisted Treatment for opioid addiction. Medication Assisted Treatment includes methadone, buprenorphine, and the more recently approved Naltrexone/Vivitrol. The NIDA publication, as referenced above, clearly indicates that “to be effective, treatment must address the individual’s drug abuse and any associated medical, psychological, social, vocational, and legal problems.” Ultimately, effective treatment goes beyond the prescribing of any of the federally approved medications. I encourage you to access this document through NIDA’s website.

It is also important to reference the Treatment Improvement Protocol, which was published through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, which is part of the Department of Health and Human Services. The publication is titled “Medication Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction in Opioid Treatment Programs” and was published in 2005. It still represents the most comprehensive resource for clinicians who use medications to treat chronic opioid addiction. “The medical community recognizes that opioid addiction is a chronic medical disorder that can be treated effectively with a combination of medication and psychosocial services. I would also encourage you to reference this comprehensive document as well, which provides extremely detailed information through SAMHSA’s website (TIP #43).

With regard to the value of investing in such treatment interventions by state and federal governments, one of the landmark studies was performed in California by Dean Gersten (CALDATA). It demonstrated the tremendous return for interventions such as methadone maintenance treatment. Another NIDA funded study (Treatment Outcome Perspective Study: TOPS) analyzed the average cost of treatment and cost to society in addition to economic benefits and costs of treatment. Dr. Rick Harwood published this study and found that every dollar invested in treatment would produce a $4.00 return in recovered social costs. Other studies have put this ratio higher at a $7.00 savings when broader medical treatment issues and criminal justice issues are taken into account. The bottom line is that providing access to such treatment saves society an enormous amount of money. Important factors to take into account include emergency room admissions, criminal justice related issues including costs of police and courts.

With regard to people truly needing access to such medication, most patients who are admitted to treatment have been using opioids for many years. Based on research studies, the clear majority of such patients have tried and failed at short term detoxification attempts or residential care. Chronic opioid addiction is known to be a chronic relapsing disorder and this is discussed in an article that Dr. Alan Leshner wrote some years ago, “Addiction is a Brain Disease”. I am attaching it for your review.

With regard to your final question, we have learned after many years of clinical practice and research, that a significant majority of the patients (75%) will need to use this medication for long periods of time. Some may need to use this medication for their natural lifetime, just as hypertensives and diabetics would remain on their medications. There really is little difference with regard to the use of medications to treat a disease which is chronic in nature. The sources that I have referenced through the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration will clearly support this perspective.

Finally, it is important to keep in mind the shame and stigma which is associated with opioid addiction and its treatment. I am attaching an article which was written by Drs. Magura and Rosenblum about the lessons learned and forgotten about treatment. The article provides an excellent summary of the many studies that have been done with regard to patient relapse as treatment is discontinued. Policymakers are advised to be extremely careful about setting up artificial barriers with regard to the length of time a patient may remain in treatment.
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Business News

Last Update on January 30, 2015 18:13 GMT

ECONOMY-GDP

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The U.S. economy slowed in the final three months of 2014 as a big burst in consumer spending was offset by weakness in other areas.

The Commerce Department says the overall economy grew at a 2.6 percent rate in the October-December period, down from sizzling gains of 4.6 percent in the second quarter and 5 percent in the third quarter.

Consumers did their part in the fourth quarter, pushing up spending by fastest rate in nearly nine years. But businesses investment, trade and government spending weakened.

For the year, the economy grew at a moderate rate of 2.4 percent. But economists believe 2015 could be a breakout year for growth, with consumer spending boosted by strong employment gains and falling gas prices. Many expect growth above 3 percent this year.

EMPLOYMENT COST

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Wages and benefits rose at the fastest pace in six years last year, a sign strong job gains could be forcing companies to pay a bit more for workers.

The Labor Department says the employment cost index, which measures pay and benefits, rose 2.2 percent in 2014, up from 2 percent the previous year. That's the biggest gain since 2008. It's also ahead of inflation, which rose 1.3 percent.

Yet the increase is still sluggish by historical standards. In a healthy economy, the index usually rises at about a 3.5 percent pace.

The Federal Reserve is closing watching wages as it considers when to raise the short-term interest rate it controls. Fed Chair Janet Yellen considers rising wages a key sign that the job market is nearing full health.

US-CONSUMER-SENTIMENT

WASHINGTON (AP) -- U.S. consumers are more confident than they've been since January 2004.

The University of Michigan says that its index of consumer sentiment rose to 98.1 in January from 93.6 last month.

Consumers say the prospects for the U.S. economy are the strongest in a decade, and half of consumers expect the expansion to keep going another five years.

The Michigan survey was the latest evidence that strong job growth and tumbling oil prices have lifted consumers' spirits. The Conference Board on Tuesday reported that its consumer confidence index climbed to the highest level since August 2007. And the Commerce Department reported Friday that consumer spending rose from October through December at the fastest pace in nearly nine years.

AMERICAN AIRLINES-PILOTS

DALLAS (AP) -- Pilots at American Airlines and US Airways have approved a single labor contract. That's a step toward combining workforces at the two carriers, which merged in December 2013.

The multiyear deal gives pilots a 23 percent pay raise retroactive to Dec. 2.

The pilots' union said Friday that the contract was approved 66 percent to 34 percent, with 95 percent of eligible pilots casting a vote.

TOYOTA-FATAL CRASH

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -- A jury of six men and six women is continuing deliberations in a case alleging a 1996 Toyota Camry had a design defect that caused a fatal crash.

Jurors received the case late Wednesday afternoon and deliberated all day Thursday without reaching a verdict. They returned to a federal courthouse in Minneapolis on Friday to keep working.

The jurors must decide whether Toyota's design of the 1996 Camry had a defect that was unreasonably dangerous. If they find there was a defect, they must decide if it directly caused injuries to those hurt or killed when Koua Fong Lee crashed into another car in 2006.

Lee spent 2 1/2 years in prison before being released after reports suggested some Toyota cars had sudden acceleration problems.

GERMANY-BMW-SECURITY FLAW

BERLIN (AP) -- German automaker BMW says it has fixed a security flaw that made 2.2 million of its vehicles vulnerable to break-ins.

The company says the problem affected BMW, Mini and Rolls Royce models equipped with its ConnectedDrive technology, which allows drivers to access certain car functions with a smartphone.

German automobile club ADAC, which discovered the flaw last summer, says hackers could have used a fake cellphone base station to intercept network traffic from the car and lower the windows or open the doors. There are no reports such a break-in ever took place.

BMW spokeswoman Silke Brigl said Friday that hackers wouldn't have been able to start or stop the engine.

Brigl said the problem has been fixed with an automatic update and customers don't need to take any action.

POM JUICE-RULING

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A federal appeals court says many advertising claims for POM Wonderful juice were deceptive in asserting that it curbs the risk of heart disease, prostate cancer and erectile dysfunction and is clinically proven to work.

In a 3-0 decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upholds the conclusion that many of POM's ads made misleading or false claims. The conclusion was reached by the Federal Trade Commission.

The ads appeared in national publications, on Internet sites, bus stops, billboards, newsletters and on tags attached to the products.

POM Wonderful LLC produces a number of pomegranate-based products.

RUSSIA-FINANCES

MOSCOW (AP) -- Russia deputy sports minister Yuri Nagornykh says his country's economic crisis is forcing athletes to scale back their training plans for next year's Olympics in Brazil.

Training camps abroad can be crucial in acclimatizing athletes for Rio de Janeiro's tropical conditions, but they are rapidly becoming unaffordable after the ruble lost almost half of its value against the U.S. dollar in the last 12 months.

Nagornykh tells Russian agency R-Sport that, with the ruble's value low and the Sports Ministry's budget facing cuts, athletes should stay in Russia rather than train abroad "in order to spend less of the currency reserves."

Officials will select priority sports and athletes for scarce funding, Nagornykh said.

The measures affect athletes for the Rio Olympics, and the 2018 Winter Olympics, he added.

OHIO STATE-ROYALTIES

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) -- The Ohio State University is cashing in after the Buckeyes' national championship victory.

The Columbus Dispatch reports the university expects a $3 million increase this year in royalties from licensed merchandise sales as fans continue to buy national championship gear and keepsakes.

Retailers say the team's special story has helped boost sales. The Buckeyes, who defied naysayers in their 42-20 victory over the University of Oregon, earned the final playoff spot after losing two starting quarterbacks to injuries.

Licensing officials also attribute increased sales to the fact Ohio State hadn't won a championship since 2002.

More than half of each dollar that comes into the school's licensing office goes to academic affairs. The athletics department, alumni association and student life program also receive portions of the revenue.

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