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Special Report: Highway Headache: Part 2

Updated: Saturday, August 3, 2013 |
Special Report: Highway Headache: Part 2 story image
WEST MICHIGAN (NEWSCHANNEL 3) - It's one of the busiest highways in the state, and one many of us travel every day.

The stretch of I-94 from Kalamazoo to Battle Creek is consistently filled with traffic tie-ups, bad accidents, and road closures.

But a plan to fix these frustrating issues may be gaining some traction, if political leaders don't slow it down.

Our I-Team investigation the past few months found there's very littel innovating and imagining these days when it comes to trying to fix a traffic problem spot.

Many of our leaders, it appears, simply feel defeated enough to not even begin to look at expanding our section of road that is in desperate need.

I-94 is the busiest two-lane highway in the entire state.

Incremental work has been done, and some work may be done in the next 15 years to fully expand I-94 from US-131 to Sprinkle Road, but that's it.

The dream of many for decades in West Michigan is to expand I-94 to three lanes in each direction from Kalamazoo to Jackson, but it would be costly--likely more than $1 billion, we found.

"There's so many players that would come into play," said M-DOT spokesman Nick Schirripa. "The stars would have to align to make that happen."

That didn't stop people in Detroit, though, from dreaming for the past decade.

They have a shovel ready project that would cost well more than $1 billion to fix I-94 through the heart of Detroit.

Once the funding is there, the project will begin.

The Detroit fix has been a 10-to-20 year process, so it appears leaders in our area may be 20 years behind to get it done.

There is an idea out there, however, that could speed up the process significantly.

The thought centers around creating a pay express lane, where you could choose to get away from all those trucks by paying a toll.

Senator Mike Nofs says he would sponsor legislation to get it done, if the federal government would sign off on it without Congressional approval.

The belief is that it's likely creating a toll lane might require an act of Congress, which could put the brakes on the idea for good.

Governor Rick Snyder has said in the past that he's not for tolls, but it appears in our one-on-one interview with him on Wednesday, he might be softening his tone.

He knows how difficult it is to raise revenues to get roads fixed, much less expanded.

The Governor and others say that most of I-94 won't be touched, though, until there's some new revenue coming in to fix what we have.

For a list of billion dollar projects around the country, click here.

For average daily traffic maps for Michigan, click here.
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Business News

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SHIP AGROUND-SETTLEMENT

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