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The NRA slogans just don't work anymore

Updated: Thursday, September 26, 2013
The NRA slogans just don
KALAMAZOO, Mich. (NEWSCHANNEL 3) – It has been a violent two weeks in Michigan, with several deadly shootings across the state.

In this installment of Tom’s Corner, Tom Van Howe says the slogans from the National Rifle Association just don’t work anymore.

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A good friend of mine is touring Croatia right now. A week or so ago, when he told our golf group where he was headed, one of them said;

“Whoa, aren’t you going to be a little worried about your personal safety?”

Croatia does have a history of civil war and some terrorism.

The fourth guy laughed and said, “Just imagine what it would be like to be a Croatian embarking on a visit here; that would make you worry about your own safety.”

I’ve been dwelling on that conversation ever since. The fourth guy was right on target. Despite its history, there is little to no violent crime in Croatia, murder is rare.

If you are a Croatian visiting the United States and you do a little research, you’ll quickly learn that about 37 percent of American households have weapons and those gun owners own two-thirds of all the weapons that exist in the world today.

You’ll learn that the number of gun owners is down by 25 percent over the past 40 years, but the number of guns owned by that group is up astronomically.

You’ll learn that American police officers own a total of roughly 900,000 guns, that civilians own roughly 300 million.

That there were 33,000 murders in the United States two years ago, about the same last year and that the vast majority of them were committed with guns.

Two weeks ago, after a dozen more people were shot dead at the Washington Navy Yard by a 34-year-old man with a security clearance who heard voices in his head.

Wayne La Pierre, the head of the NRA, once again trotted out his worn-out slogan that “the only thing to stop a bad man with a gun is a good man with a gun.”

At odds with virtually every chief of police in every city in the country, La Pierre continues the drumbeat for his view that more guns is better, that if we all carried we’d all be better off because the good guys will win, and I’m tired of it.

This stream of bird seed from him and others like him is simply making us numb to the reality of violence that is all around us.

Saginaw, two nights ago, triple shooting. Two are dead.

Muskegon, over the weekend, three dead, another wounded at the Elks Charity Lodge. There a dying teenage girl asks police to tell her mother and her sister that she loves them.

Kalamazoo, over the weekend, two people shot and hundreds flee a party at the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity house at Western Michigan University.

Lansing, eight days ago, four young people shot and wounded at Sexton High School.

Ludington, two weeks ago, MSP trooper Paul Butterfield pulls over a truck and is shot in the head by the idiot behind the wheel.

Detroit, over the past month, too many shootings and deaths to talk about here, both children and adults are victimized, at least 30 in all.

A couple of weeks ago, Detroit and Flint are named the two most dangerous cities in the nation, guns and death all over the place.

It’s gotten to the point that when I read those stories in the paper or hear them on TV, I zone out. It’s the result, I think, of a helpless feeling that with all the power and wealth of the NRA and the fear they engender in our lawmakers, nothing is ever going to change, that we’re simply stuck with the brutality and violence the status-quo has to offer.

Last week, as the apparent result of a road-rage incident, two men, both described by others as “good guys” shot it out at a car wash in Ionia. Both carried concealed weapons permits, one of them is believed to have owned up to a hundred guns.

Both of them are dead and I’m wondering if Wayne La Pierre could help us out and tell us, which one was the good guy? Does it make a difference, or is this what happens when too many good guys, who live their lives in fear, carry guns for protection against other fearful good guys who carry guns for protection?

This is madness.

In this corner, I’m Tom Van Howe.

Business News

Last Update on November 28, 2014 20:00 GMT

HOLIDAY SHOPPING-BLACK FRIDAY

UNDATED (AP) -- A lot of Americans seem willing to head out to the malls, right after Thanksgiving dinner.

The Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota, says it drew 100,000 customers between 5 p.m. yesterday and 1 a.m. today. A spokesman says traffic slowed down after 2 a.m., but it's been picking up again today. And mall officials are still hoping to top last year's total of 230,000 Thursday-to-Friday visitors.

One shopper at a mall in Aurora, Illinois, this morning said she thinks people are feeling more confident about the economy this year. But Kimberly States said she still plans to spend about the same amount -- or maybe less -- on Christmas gifts compared with last year.

For retailers hoping for strong online sales, it's not the best time for technical issues. But Best Buy's website has been down this morning, with a message that asks customers to "Check back soon."

BRITAIN-BLACK FRIDAY

LONDON (AP) -- Americans celebrating Thanksgiving in Britain may have felt right at home as Black Friday shopping chaos caused some disruption.

The practice of offering bargain basement prices the day after Thanksgiving has spread across the Atlantic, with some retailers opening overnight to lure determined shoppers.

Police were called early Friday morning to help maintain security at some supermarkets and outlets that offered deep discounts starting at midnight.

Fights broke out at some stores and major websites stopped functioning because of too much traffic as shoppers sought online bargains.

Greater Manchester Police said two arrests were made and injuries reported as police closed some stores to prevent more severe problems.

The force tweeted "Keep calm, people!" at one point.

There were problems in many parts of Britain, including Wales and Scotland.

FERGUSON

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) -- Demonstrators are looking to grab the attention of post-Thanksgiving shoppers today, to voice their anger over a grand jury's decision not to indict the police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown in suburban St. Louis.

They've been going to major retailers around the St. Louis area to speak out. And similar protests have been planned at shopping centers around the nation.

In Chicago, about 200 people gathered near the city's Magnificent Mile shopping district. One demonstrator called it "a day of awareness and engagement." Kristiana Colon said, `We want them to think twice before spending that dollar today." She added, "As long as black lives are put second to materialism, there will be no peace."

Early today in the St. Louis suburb of Manchester, about two dozen people chanted, "No justice, no peace, no racist police" after police moved them out of a Wal-Mart.

Other planned events around the country seemed relatively brief and thinly attended. In Brooklyn, New York, a "Hands Up, Don't Shop" protest had been scheduled, but no one materialized.

Security was heightened at the Wal-Mart in Ferguson on Friday morning, with military Humvees, police cars and security guards on patrol. The store was busy, but there were no protesters.

CANDY CENTER FIRE

MAPLE HEIGHTS, Ohio (AP) -- Some orders for chocolates have been halted after fire gutted a candy warehouse and distribution center in northeast Ohio.

Authorities are trying to determine what caused the blaze that began Thursday morning at the Fannie May Fine Chocolates center in Maple Heights, Ohio. Authorities said there were no injuries.

Firefighters from several departments responded, and hazardous materials units stood by because of ammonia in the center.

Fannie May Chocolates is a division of 1-800-Flowers.com Inc. The company says it is assessing the effects of the fire and the contingency plans that will be needed for the holiday season.

The company on Friday posted a message on its website saying Fannie May and its Harry London gourmet chocolates business have temporarily halted orders for most of their candies and confections.

TRADE-MEAT LABELING

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The United States is appealing a World Trade Organization decision that made it harder for U.S. consumers to know where meat in the grocery store came from.

The WTO in October rejected U.S. rules requiring labels on packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat identifying where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered. The WTO said the "country of origin labeling" requirements put Canadian and Mexican livestock at a disadvantage.

On Friday, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative appealed the ruling.

U.S. farmers who compete with Mexican and Canadian ranchers welcomed the appeal. National Farmers Union President Roger Johnson on Friday called it "the right thing to do for American family farmers, ranchers and consumers." But meatpackers oppose the labeling requirements, saying they impose costly paperwork.

EUROPE-ECONOMY

BRUSSELS (AP) -- Sharp falls in energy prices as a result of the dramatic decline being recorded in oil markets has pushed inflation across the 18-country eurozone down to 0.3 percent in the year to November.

Preliminary figures from the European Union's statistics agency, Eurostat, show that the fall in eurozone consumer price inflation from the previous month's 0.4 percent was largely due to a 2.5 percent decline in energy costs.

The drop takes inflation further away from the European Central Bank's target to keep price rises just below 2 percent. It's likely to maintain pressure on policymakers to launch in the coming months a monetary stimulus similar to the one the Federal Reserve recently brought to an end.

Eurostat also said Friday that unemployment was steady in October at 11.5 percent.

EUROPE-BUDGETS

BRUSSELS (AP) -- The head of the European Union's executive is opting not to sanction France or Italy just yet over their failure to meet targets on their public finances.

Instead, EU Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker is giving them until spring to deliver on commitments.

In an interview with eight European papers, published Friday, Juncker says he has "made the choice not to sanction," for the failure of Paris and Rome to meet rules that force the euro member states to observe strict limits on spending.

France and Italy have been accused of being too profligate in their budgetary spending plans at a time when the EU and the 18-country eurozone have been advocating strict austerity as the best way to get their public finances into shape.

EUROPE-UKRAINE SANCTIONS

BRUSSELS (AP) -- The European Union is extending economic and travel sanctions to 13 people and five entities it accuses of involvement with pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine.

The EU's 28 member countries agreed to the action Friday, the bloc announced in a news release.

The EU said the names of the people, organizations and businesses affected will be made public Saturday.

The decision brings the total number of people subject to an EU-wide travel ban and asset freeze for allegedly undermining Ukraine's territorial integrity to 132, and the number of entities whose assets have been ordered frozen to 28.

Earlier this month, EU foreign affairs chief Federica Mogherini said more sanctions alone will not end the crisis in eastern Ukraine, and that there is a need to relaunch a dialogue with Russia.

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