What happened to the outrage?

Updated: Friday, April 11, 2014
What happened to the outrage? story image
KALAMAZOO, Mich. (NEWSCHANNEL 3) - The world is still waiting for the internal report to put the finger on just why it took General Motors up to ten years to issue a recall for 2.5 million cars that may have fatally faulty ignition switches.

It's a problem the world's largest automaker more or less now concedes is to blame for at least 31 crashes and 13 deaths.

But for 10 years, GM simply sat on the problem.

Tonight in Tom's Corner, our Tom Van Howe wonders what in the world has happened to outrage.

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Maybe we're just numb. But the last century was replete with people standing up and shouting about what they thought was wrong, unjust, unfair, and demanding action.

But not so much anymore. The voices of outrage have turned into whispers.

Maybe its because the new century began with the war in Iraq--as completely misguided vengeance for the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center.

We were told by experts there were no weapons of mass destruction there, and there weren't. The 9/11 hijackers were Saudi Arabian...not Iraqi.

If one objected, that person was unpatriotic.

Then Afghanistan. Death, destruction, and torture--something we believed we didn't do.

Now we know that we did. Enthusiastically.

Then came the drones, raining death on both terrorists and wedding parties. We worry they'll be used on us to watch, listen, and record.

And why not worry? Credit the fugitive whistle-blower Edward Snowden for tipping us off on the incredible reach of the national security agency.

We live in a world where almost nothing is private.

We endlessly debate immigration reform in a Congress that accomplishes almost nothing. Its no wonder Congress has an approval rating of about 10 percent.

Meantime we're breaking up families on a daily basis--deporting record numbers of people back to Mexico.

We continue extolling our right to bear arms while gun violence continues haunting the streets of our cities.

We don't vote much anymore. In off-year elections roughly 15 percent of us make decisions for all the rest.

Big money is completely taking over the battle for free and equal speech. Its no longer free nor equal.

Wall street continues unregulated.  And while the way we pay for healthcare has people on the right apoplectic, no one talks much about the high-and-still-soaring cost of healthcare.

So maybe its just domestic battle fatigue that has people shrugging their shoulders about the way General Motors shirked a life-and-death responsibility for a full decade.

Executives in Detroit knew back in 2004 there was an ignition switch problem in Chevy Cobalts and HHR's, and in Pontiac G7s, Pursuits, and Solstices, and Saturn Ions and Skys.

They knew before and after their bankruptcy and the ensuing bailout that if the switches were jarred or if the key had too heavy a ring on it, it could malfunction and turn off the engine--leaving the driver without air brakes, power steering, or operable airbags.

Result? A documented 31 crashes and 13 deaths.

Consumer Reports says there have been more than 300 deaths in GM cars with undeployed air bags.

And none of it should have happened. None of it.
 
This is a company kept alive by the American people who in return were given a hand gesture.

Has it made me angry? Absolutely. I feel as though I've been had. Trouble is, I don't know what to do with my anger.

Ever since the Supreme Court said corporations are people too, its taken the wind out of my sails.

I want to shout at somebody. I want to punch somebody.

But neither option seems very effective against one of the largest corporations. And how do you punch a corporation anyway?

Maybe if I ignore it...it'll all just go away.

In this corner, I'm Tom Van Howe.

Business News

Last Update on October 02, 2014 08:13 GMT

FINANCIAL MARKETS

UNDATED (AP) -- Financial markets got off to a rough start in October as disappointing economic news and Ebola fears drove stocks lower. Surveys indicated German and U.S. manufacturing had slowed last month.

Asian stocks fell Thursday amid similar anxieties.

Japan's Nikkei 225 index lost 1.7 percent to 15,815.45 points and South Korea's Kospi fell 0.9 percent to 1,973.31. Australia's S&P/ASX 200 declined 0.7 percent to 5,295.7. Stocks in Southeast Asia also lost ground. Markets in Hong Kong and China were closed for a public holiday.

In New York, investors dumped airline stocks amid concerns that travel will decline because of the Ebola threat, and bought a handful of drug companies working on experimental treatments for the deadly disease.

Nervous investors shifted their money to havens like bonds and gold.

The blue chip Dow index lost 238.19 points, or 1.4 percent, to 16,804.71. The Standard & Poor's 500 index lost 26.13 points, or 1.3 percent, to 1,946.16 and the Nasdaq composite lost 71.30 points, or 1.6 percent, to 4,422.09.

ECONOMY-THE DAY AHEAD

WASHINGTON (AP) --The Labor Department will report on the number of people who applied for unemployment benefits last week. Economists forecast that weekly applications rose a slight 5,000 to a seasonally adjusted 298,000.

Also today, the Commerce Department reports on U.S. factory orders for August. In July, factory orders rose 10.5 percent, the biggest one-month increase on record going back to 1992.

Freddie Mac will report on average U.S. mortgage rates for this week. Last week, the average for the 30-year loan eased to 4.2 percent from 4.23 percent the previous week.

EBOLA-AIRLINES

UNDATED (AP) -- The first reported case of Ebola in the United States has caused concern among airline investors and is raising the prospect that some frightened travelers might stay home.

Details of the man's 28-hour trip from western Africa emerged Wednesday. He flew on two airlines, took three flights, and had lengthy airport layovers before reaching Texas on Sept. 20.

Still, federal officials say other passengers on the flights are at no risk of infection because the man had no symptoms at the time of his trip.

Thomas Eric Duncan left Monrovia, Liberia, on Sept. 19 aboard a Brussels Airlines jet to the Belgian capital, according to a Belgian official. After layover of nearly seven hours, he boarded United Airlines Flight 951 to Dulles International Airport near Washington, D.C. After another layover of nearly three hours, he then flew Flight 822 from Dulles to Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, the airline confirmed.

MINIMUM WAGE

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Labor Department is following through on President Barack Obama's pledge to get the ball rolling on a higher national minimum wage in the absence of any congressional legislation to accomplish this goal.

Labor Secretary Thomas Perez has finalized a federal rule raising the minimum wage for employees of federal contractors to $10.10 an hour.

Wednesday's move puts in force a step that Obama announced last February. The Labor Department said nearly 200,000 American workers will benefit from the new minimum, which takes effect Jan 1.

The minimum federal wage is now $7.25 an hour. Obama has proposed the higher pay level for all workers, but that has drawn resistance from Republicans in Congress. In announcing the new rule, Perez says that by raising the minimum wage for workers on federal contracts, the administration "is rewarding a hard day's work with fair pay."

STOCKTON BANKRUPTCY TRIAL

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) -- A federal judge dealing with the bankruptcy issue has struck at the sanctity of public pensions in California.

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Christopher Klein ruled Wednesday that federal bankruptcy law allows the city of Stockton to treat pension fund obligations like other debts, meaning the city could trim benefits.

The city of Stockton argued that it must make its pension contributions for public employees before its creditors are paid the entire amount they are owned.

The case is being closely watched because it could help clarify who gets paid first by financially strapped cities around the nation -- retirement funds or creditors.

The ruling was prompted by a key creditor's contention that pension obligations should be treated like other debts.

DETROIT BANKRUPTCY

DETROIT (AP) -- Emergency manager Kevyn Orr has testified in bankruptcy court that when he took over Detroit's finances, he found a city with poor services for residents, next to no cash flow and significant neighborhood blight.

Orr, hired by the state in March 2013 to fix Detroit's finances, took the city into the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. He was called to the stand and questioned by a city lawyer in federal court in Detroit.

Judge Steven Rhodes is to decide whether Orr's plan to remove $7 billion in debt is fair to creditors. Orr has said Detroit's unsecured debt is about $12 billion.

Orr said Wednesday that before he filed for bankruptcy, every creditor wanted to be "paid in full."

DAIMLER ALLEGATIONS

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- Oregon's labor commissioner has filed a complaint against heavy-duty truck and school bus manufacturer Daimler Trucks North America, alleging five employees at its Portland plant were subjected to racial slurs and threats.

A statement Wednesday from Commissioner Brad Avakian says the accusations will be investigated, and if they bear out, workers could be awarded damages including back pay if they've quit.

Among the allegations, according to the statement, is that a Daimler Trucks employee threatened a black co-worker with a noose, saying he'd drag the African-American behind a car.

A statement from Daimler Trucks said it doesn't tolerate discrimination and trains employees to avoid it. It also said the company is cooperating with the investigation and has hired an outside investigator to look into the allegations.

HEALTH OVERHAUL-RATES-MISSOURI

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) -- A consumer group is suing the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to obtain information used to justify insurance rates in Missouri.

The Consumer Council of Missouri filed the complaint Tuesday in federal court. The agency didn't immediately respond to an email to its press office seeking comment.

The consumer group says the new health insurance law requires the agency to make the rate information public so consumers have the chance to challenge the costs they pay for health insurance. But the suit alleges that HHS has denied its records request.

Missouri is one of several states allowing the federal government to run their health insurance exchange. The suit says Missouri is reliant on HHS for any information regarding health insurance plans to be sold in 2015.

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